Covered Bridge- Woodstock, Vermont-93E1589

I have been fascinated by Covered Bridges after I read the book and saw the movie titled” The Bridge of Madison county.”  I would drive several miles in quasi unpopulated towns only to have a look at covered bridges and take several snapshots.  Below is one of the first ones I uncovered while driving to the state of Vermont last month.

Covered Bridge- Woodstock, Vermont-93E1589-1

When you think of covered bridge, you wonder why this fascination to them?  For the most part, they are located in remote and rural areas.  For some towns, they represent their most treasured landmarks and in Vermont while reaching 104 covered bridges in total, they typify the beauty and grace of simple structures.

Covered Bridge- Woodstock, Vermont-93E1589-2

A covered bridge is a timber-truss bridge with a roof and siding which, in most covered bridges, create an almost complete enclosure.  The purpose of the covering is to protect the wooden structural members from the weather. Uncovered wooden bridges have a lifespan of only 10 to 15 years because of the effects of rain and sun.

 

Covered Bridge- Woodstock, Vermont-93E1589-3

Bridges having covers for reasons other than protecting wood trusses, such as for protecting pedestrians and keeping horses from shying away from water, are also sometimes called covered bridges.  Below is the pedestrian walkway.

Covered Bridge- Woodstock, Vermont-93E1589-4

Here you can see the other side of the covered bridge.

Covered Bridge- Woodstock, Vermont-93E1589-5

A nice wooden structure for this bridge in Woodstock .

Covered Bridge- Woodstock, Vermont-93E1615

 

4 thoughts on “Covered Bridge- Woodstock, Vermont-93E1589

  1. Lovely and interesting, both.
    I also know a place with an old covered bridge like this, it is in a small and unknown German town named Sömmerda (abt. 30 kms. from Weimar in Thuringia), some of my grand-grandparents were from.

    Like

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